Regular hours resumed Sept. 7, 2021

15/10/2021

Ottawa Public Library has returned to regular pre-pandemic hours at most branches as of September 7, 2021 — including Sunday hours at 10 branches and InfoService. Hours are posted at branch entrances and on the Hours and location page of the OPL website.   

 

Carp Branch

18/10/2021

Carp branch will be closed on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 for operational use by the City of Ottawa. Regular service will resume Wednesday,  October 27, 2021 at 10 am. 

Overdrive: Issues with older Apple devices or browsers

12/10/2021

Recent changes by Overdrive and Libby have impacted compatibility with older versions of Apple's mobile and desktop operating systems. Those who use older Apple devices (Mac computers running lower than macOS 10.12.1 and iPhones/iPads running iOS 9) may have trouble using the OverDrive desktop or mobile apps, while Libby is no longer supported on iPhones and iPads running iOS 9.

Carlingwood branch: Elevator out of service

18/10/2021

The elevator at Carlingwood branch is currently out of service. 

Alta Vista branch: Reopening October 22

21/10/2021

Alta Vista branch will return to regular service and hours on Friday, October 22, 2021.

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Global Accessibility Awareness Day

May 20, 2021

Across the world, accessibility is a human right for all, particularly for people with disabilities.  Great progress has been made in creating more accessible workspaces, mediums, and digital platforms to ensure fair and equal access for everyone.  That being said, there is still more work to be done, and creating greater awareness around the need for accessibility in all its forms is a huge part of that work.  Fortunately, the month of May marks some big days of acknowledging and working towards accessibility.  The Global Accessibility Awareness Day(GAAD) is celebrated on Thursday, May 20, and the City of Ottawa will celebrate AccessAbility Awareness Day on May 27.Global Accessibility Awareness Day is meant to prompt conversations and acknowledgment of accessibility – in particular, digital accessibility.  GAAD recognises the following about digital accessibility: “Every user deserves a first-rate digital experience on the web. Someone with a disability must be able to experience web-based services, content and other digital products with the same successful outcome as those without disabilities,” (“What is Digital Accessibility?”, Global Accessibility Awareness Day).  GAAD cites that over one billion people have a disability or impairment; however, when analysing the same number of websites, the majority had multiple accessibility issues.  That means that millions of people do not have fair and equal access to millions of online resources.  This results in people with disabilities being barred from full customer services, educational services, and even financial services.  With more and more information resources being digitized, digital accessibility is of the utmost importance across all organizations and the services they provide.    Accessibility for all is a core principle that the Ottawa Public Library (OPL) abides by and strives for.  The library offers numerous services to accommodate people with disabilities, and continuously explores ways in which these services and our policies can be improved, or what additional accommodations can be created.  When it comes to digital accessibility, the OPL provides an accessible website as well as assistive technology workstations.  As of 2014, the OPL websiteis in full compliance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and has integrated its resources into a user-friendly interface.  Our assistive technology workstations include equipment such as magnifiers, closed captioning, as well as reading and writing software for peoples with disabilities among many other tools.  Ensuring that the members of our communities have access to all that the library has to offer is a responsibility that the OPL takes seriously in its efforts to uphold its principles of the public good, and social responsibility.This May 20, the Ottawa Public Library encourages everyone to observe the Global Accessibility Awareness Day.  Check out their resources, other events, and consider participating!  GAAD is always hosting discussions and activities to increase accessibility awareness across the globe, so there is something for everyone.  Simply looking into the accessibility status of your organization’s website or online resources is a great first step that can lead to improving your digital accessibility. All of our steps towards accessibility combined can create great change.  We can all work towards educating and empowering ourselves as we strive to provide accessibility for all.   

 

Comments

REF: Capital of Canada – Ottawa: OPL: Sheriff of Nottingham

REF: Capital of Canada – Ottawa: OPL: Sheriff of Nottingham FOCUS: “ Libraries … Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. … “ TO: Mayor & entire Ottawa City Council, CC: OPL Board of Trustees, OPL Senior Management and some staff, OPH, and other diverse “government” (elected or appointed) representatives Mayor Watson & entire Ottawa City Council, Here below is an "add-on" that was not completely included, in an earlier e-mail, of the same date (May 20th, 2021): Below Sent (Friday) April 30th, 2021: Mr. Robert, FYR...Below, I have included the link to the (published) article and following the link is an added comment, that I sent to a few friends, who had read the article: https://centretownbuzz.com/2021/04/16/centretowner-on-the-wrong-side-of-the-ottawa-public-librarys-digital-divide/?cxn=opl&cxk=db (Centretowner on the wrong side of the Ottawa Public Library’s digital divide < Page 1 + 11 >) The (OPL) finance (budget) numbers near the end of the article, researched by the editor (Alayne McGregor) and her team “tell” a “telling tale”. These numbers only reinforce to me that the OPL (Management and Board of Trustees) have “used” aspects of “COVID-19” to further their agenda at the expense of diverse OPL Patrons. One specific demographic are those (digital divide) patrons who rely on the OPL “Technical Services” (Computers with (Secure) High-Speed Internet Access along with Printers and Scanners, as well as Photocopiers) . Beyond the OPL, I believe that there are many organizations (Business, Gov't, NGOs, and Services (Community) as well as some individuals) that have imposed restrictions in the name (or under the guise) of “COVID-19”, but, those “restrictions” have absolutely nothing to with “COVID-19”. Right now, (continuing) at the top of my list is the OPL. Below, the following “beginning” section was sent, prior to the above “add-on” on May 20th, 2021, to all of the “cc” noted above and to: Mayor Watson & entire Ottawa City Council, Each of you (continue) to disenfranchise a segment of YOUR electorate, by continuing to disallow access to “technical services” (computers with (secure) high-speed Internet, printers, scanners, and photocopiers) at the OPL (Ottawa Public Library). Effectively, Mayor Watson and the entire Ottawa City Council have chosen to ensure that those of their electorate, the ones who are part of the “digital divide”, are not worthy and are systemically excluded from the community. Here below are a number of links: Extracted from: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown Libraries … Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. … Yet, the OPL and the OPL Board of Trustees, in conjunction with the Ottawa Mayor and the entire City Council have profited, with a 24% surplus, in the OPL budget. That “surplus” has partially been derived by depriving “essential” services to those of the “digital divide”. As noted above (and below), those residents of the City of Ottawa, who are a part of the “digital divide”, that is lacking or without access to “technical services” (computers with (secure) high-speed Internet, printers, scanners, and photocopiers) continue to disenfranchised and systemically excluded from the community. Following are just a sampling of the (recent) communication to the OPL, OPL Board of Trustees, OPH, and diverse “government” (elected or appointed) representatives: The following was sent on (Friday) April 9th, 2021: Ref: PUBLIC Libraries are an ESSENTIAL Service, not a Luxury Sir / Madam, The OPL (Management) has decided that a segment of the residents of the City of Ottawa are to be disenfranchised, specifically, those who are part of the “digital divide”. That is those without 24/7 access to a computing device with (secure) “high-speed” Internet or a printer, scanner, or a photocopier at home or work. The recent notice on OPL Blog (website) states: “With the announcement of a provincial emergency and stay-at-home order, we have decided to return to curbside services…Starting today, April 8, customers will no longer be permitted to enter...Until then, please explore OPL’s digital collection and enjoy a wide variety of virtual programming” (NOTE: How is that possible without a computing device with an Internet connection?) Above Taken From: https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/blogs/opl-services%E2%80%AFduring-stay-home-order (Dated: April 8th, 2021) Yet the recent ONT Gov't website states (a) “... Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises < libraries > to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. (b) Here (below) is the full extract, including the “library” reference: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown (… in effect as of Thursday, April 8, at 12:01 a.m...) Libraries Circulating materials must be reserved over the telephone or online for contactless curbside, delivery or pick-up. Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. Patrons must not: be in the book stacks handle circulating materials that are shelved or in other areas of library storage Circulating materials returned to the library must be disinfected or quarantined before they are recirculated. Other permitted services include: child care services mental health and addiction support services, to a limit of 10 people social services Furthermore, the OPL Board of Trustees is comprised of nine members, of which, four are (Ottawa) City Counsellors. That would suggest that those four city counsellors are accepting that a segment of their electorate are to be systemically disenfranchised. Once again, I query? How many of the OPL (Management and Staff), the OPL Board of Trustees, the City of Ottawa (Appointed, Elected, or Staff) or any of the Management or Staff with Ottawa Public Health are without access 24/7, either at work or home to computing devices, printers, scanners, photocopiers, or other related “technical” services. I would surmise, very few. And how much would any of these individuals get done, if suddenly, they had absolutely no access to technical services for four or more weeks. Again, the answer is nothing. Yet, that is what the OPL (Management) and the others have (once again) unilaterally imposed on a segment of the residents of the City of Ottawa, who are without these resources at home or work. Meanwhile, how is it that according to the recent announcement on the ONT Gov't website, (link referenced earlier) it states: “Motor vehicle sales...recreational vehicles including motor homes; trailers and travel trailers; boats and other watercraft;...” So, “purchasing” a (recreational) “...boat or other watercraft...“ vehicle is deemed to be essential, and the OPL (Management) seems to believe that systemically cutting off (or excluding) those who must use the OPL Technical Services (Computers, Internet, Printers, Scanner, or Photocopiers) is acceptable? I think not. Skewed Priorities? In my view, (and those that I have queried, say), that the purchase of a (recreational) “boat or watercraft” vehicle is a luxury. Whereas access to “Technical Services” at the OPL is ESSENTIAL. What else is ESSENTIAL? How is it that some discount stores have recently informed some individuals, that diapers are not an essential need or that the purchase of a birthday card for a 95 year old senior, in lock-down, is not a necessity? Not everybody can afford to shop, either in person or on-line, at the “big-name” retail stores. The discount stores are not luxuries, but are absolutely a daily necessity for “day to day” purchases, for those with limited (financial) resources. And that necessity extends to individuals who need to use the OPL Technical Services. (That includes computers with (secure) “high-speed” Internet or a printer, scanner, or a photocopier.) In a nutshell, it is my belief that the OPL (Management) is out of touch with the “day to day” needs of a segment of its patrons, specifically, those individuals, who are a part of the “digital divide”. Cordially yours, dpi Prior Inputted Comments: (Friday) April 2nd, 2021 Sir / Madam, Apparently, it seems that ALL of the OPL Branches are ALL of the SAME size. However, any individuals, like myself, who have been to multiple OPL locations, know that is certainly not the reality. So, the decision by the OPL Management to mandate access to only ONE computer, at each of the 28 of 31 open branches is unreasonable and excessively restricted, especially for those who are part of the “DIGITAL DIVIDE”. (That is those, who lack 24/7 access at home or work to a computing device with a high-speed Internet service or a printer or scanner <or photocopier>.) The following extract is taken from: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown (On Friday April 1st, 2021) Libraries Circulating materials must be reserved over the telephone or online for contactless curbside, delivery or pick-up. Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. Patrons must not: be in the book stacks handle circulating materials that are shelved or in other areas of library storage Circulating materials returned to the library must be disinfected or quarantined before they are recirculated. Other permitted services include: child care services mental health and addiction support services, to a limit of 10 people social services Prior Inputted Comments: (Saturday) March 20th, 2021 REF: Libraries are ESSENTIAL Services Sir / Madam, In addition to the necessity of the re-opening of the OPL "24 /7 - (Return) Drop-Boxes". There is a significant need for INCREASED access, to the "PUBLIC" computers. Only being able to access a COMPUTER with an Internet connection and a SCANNER, PRINTER, or (COPIER), for a hour or less a day, and that excludes Sundays, when numerous branches are usually open, from September to June, but (still) continue to be closed. Coupled with the (on-going) Sunday closures, the current (overall) branch hours are insufficient, especially, the evening hours, from Monday to Thursday. As well, individuals must be able to book a computer, over a seven-day period, not the current dismal, only three days and individuals need to be able to book for two or more consecutive hours, each day. For those many OPL Management and Employees, who are NOT part of the "DIGITAL DIVIDE. That is to say, they do not lack "24/7 access to "high-speed" Internet, linked to a computing device, along with a connected scanner, printer, or copier", I would suggest that each one should try to function, for at least a week, within the current OPL parameters for accessing a "PUBLIC" computer. I propose that their (or your) overall ability to function (well) at work or home, or both would be severely curtailed. Yet, that is the what the OPL, as well as the City of Ottawa, the Province of Ontario, and the Government of Canada have unilaterally imposed on individuals and families, who are part of the "digital divide", for now over one year. For those individuals and families, who are part of the "digital divide", the "PUBLIC" library, whether in Ottawa or elsewhere in Canada, is an absolute necessity. Cordially yours, - A Concerned Patron - FOCUS: “ Libraries … Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. … “ TO: Mayor & entire Ottawa City Council, CC: OPL Board of Trustees, OPL Senior Management and some staff, OPH, and other diverse “government” (elected or appointed) representatives Mayor Watson & entire Ottawa City Council, Here below is an "add-on" that was not completely included, in an earlier e-mail, of the same date (May 20th, 2021): Below Sent (Friday) April 30th, 2021: Mr. Robert, FYR...Below, I have included the link to the (published) article and following the link is an added comment, that I sent to a few friends, who had read the article: https://centretownbuzz.com/2021/04/16/centretowner-on-the-wrong-side-of-the-ottawa-public-librarys-digital-divide/?cxn=opl&cxk=db (Centretowner on the wrong side of the Ottawa Public Library’s digital divide < Page 1 + 11 >) The (OPL) finance (budget) numbers near the end of the article, researched by the editor (Alayne McGregor) and her team “tell” a “telling tale”. These numbers only reinforce to me that the OPL (Management and Board of Trustees) have “used” aspects of “COVID-19” to further their agenda at the expense of diverse OPL Patrons. One specific demographic are those (digital divide) patrons who rely on the OPL “Technical Services” (Computers with (Secure) High-Speed Internet Access along with Printers and Scanners, as well as Photocopiers) . Beyond the OPL, I believe that there are many organizations (Business, Gov't, NGOs, and Services (Community) as well as some individuals) that have imposed restrictions in the name (or under the guise) of “COVID-19”, but, those “restrictions” have absolutely nothing to with “COVID-19”. Right now, (continuing) at the top of my list is the OPL. Below, the following “beginning” section was sent, prior to the above “add-on” on May 20th, 2021, to all of the “cc” noted above and to: Mayor Watson & entire Ottawa City Council, Each of you (continue) to disenfranchise a segment of YOUR electorate, by continuing to disallow access to “technical services” (computers with (secure) high-speed Internet, printers, scanners, and photocopiers) at the OPL (Ottawa Public Library). Effectively, Mayor Watson and the entire Ottawa City Council have chosen to ensure that those of their electorate, the ones who are part of the “digital divide”, are not worthy and are systemically excluded from the community. Here below are a number of links: Extracted from: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown Libraries … Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. … Yet, the OPL and the OPL Board of Trustees, in conjunction with the Ottawa Mayor and the entire City Council have profited, with a 24% surplus, in the OPL budget. That “surplus” has partially been derived by depriving “essential” services to those of the “digital divide”. As noted above (and below), those residents of the City of Ottawa, who are a part of the “digital divide”, that is lacking or without access to “technical services” (computers with (secure) high-speed Internet, printers, scanners, and photocopiers) continue to disenfranchised and systemically excluded from the community. Following are just a sampling of the (recent) communication to the OPL, OPL Board of Trustees, OPH, and diverse “government” (elected or appointed) representatives: The following was sent on (Friday) April 9th, 2021: Ref: PUBLIC Libraries are an ESSENTIAL Service, not a Luxury Sir / Madam, The OPL (Management) has decided that a segment of the residents of the City of Ottawa are to be disenfranchised, specifically, those who are part of the “digital divide”. That is those without 24/7 access to a computing device with (secure) “high-speed” Internet or a printer, scanner, or a photocopier at home or work. The recent notice on OPL Blog (website) states: “With the announcement of a provincial emergency and stay-at-home order, we have decided to return to curbside services…Starting today, April 8, customers will no longer be permitted to enter...Until then, please explore OPL’s digital collection and enjoy a wide variety of virtual programming” (NOTE: How is that possible without a computing device with an Internet connection?) Above Taken From: https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/blogs/opl-services%E2%80%AFduring-stay-home-order (Dated: April 8th, 2021) Yet the recent ONT Gov't website states (a) “... Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises < libraries > to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. (b) Here (below) is the full extract, including the “library” reference: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown (… in effect as of Thursday, April 8, at 12:01 a.m...) Libraries Circulating materials must be reserved over the telephone or online for contactless curbside, delivery or pick-up. Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. Patrons must not: be in the book stacks handle circulating materials that are shelved or in other areas of library storage Circulating materials returned to the library must be disinfected or quarantined before they are recirculated. Other permitted services include: child care services mental health and addiction support services, to a limit of 10 people social services Furthermore, the OPL Board of Trustees is comprised of nine members, of which, four are (Ottawa) City Counsellors. That would suggest that those four city counsellors are accepting that a segment of their electorate are to be systemically disenfranchised. Once again, I query? How many of the OPL (Management and Staff), the OPL Board of Trustees, the City of Ottawa (Appointed, Elected, or Staff) or any of the Management or Staff with Ottawa Public Health are without access 24/7, either at work or home to computing devices, printers, scanners, photocopiers, or other related “technical” services. I would surmise, very few. And how much would any of these individuals get done, if suddenly, they had absolutely no access to technical services for four or more weeks. Again, the answer is nothing. Yet, that is what the OPL (Management) and the others have (once again) unilaterally imposed on a segment of the residents of the City of Ottawa, who are without these resources at home or work. Meanwhile, how is it that according to the recent announcement on the ONT Gov't website, (link referenced earlier) it states: “Motor vehicle sales...recreational vehicles including motor homes; trailers and travel trailers; boats and other watercraft;...” So, “purchasing” a (recreational) “...boat or other watercraft...“ vehicle is deemed to be essential, and the OPL (Management) seems to believe that systemically cutting off (or excluding) those who must use the OPL Technical Services (Computers, Internet, Printers, Scanner, or Photocopiers) is acceptable? I think not. Skewed Priorities? In my view, (and those that I have queried, say), that the purchase of a (recreational) “boat or watercraft” vehicle is a luxury. Whereas access to “Technical Services” at the OPL is ESSENTIAL. What else is ESSENTIAL? How is it that some discount stores have recently informed some individuals, that diapers are not an essential need or that the purchase of a birthday card for a 95 year old senior, in lock-down, is not a necessity? Not everybody can afford to shop, either in person or on-line, at the “big-name” retail stores. The discount stores are not luxuries, but are absolutely a daily necessity for “day to day” purchases, for those with limited (financial) resources. And that necessity extends to individuals who need to use the OPL Technical Services. (That includes computers with (secure) “high-speed” Internet or a printer, scanner, or a photocopier.) In a nutshell, it is my belief that the OPL (Management) is out of touch with the “day to day” needs of a segment of its patrons, specifically, those individuals, who are a part of the “digital divide”. Cordially yours, dpi Prior Inputted Comments: (Friday) April 2nd, 2021 Sir / Madam, Apparently, it seems that ALL of the OPL Branches are ALL of the SAME size. However, any individuals, like myself, who have been to multiple OPL locations, know that is certainly not the reality. So, the decision by the OPL Management to mandate access to only ONE computer, at each of the 28 of 31 open branches is unreasonable and excessively restricted, especially for those who are part of the “DIGITAL DIVIDE”. (That is those, who lack 24/7 access at home or work to a computing device with a high-speed Internet service or a printer or scanner <or photocopier>.) The following extract is taken from: https://www.ontario.ca/page/enhancing-public-health-and-workplace-safety-measures-provincewide-shutdown (On Friday April 1st, 2021) Libraries Circulating materials must be reserved over the telephone or online for contactless curbside, delivery or pick-up. Patrons must only be permitted to enter the premises to facilitate the contactless drop-off and pick-up or access computers, photocopiers or similar services. Patrons must not: be in the book stacks handle circulating materials that are shelved or in other areas of library storage Circulating materials returned to the library must be disinfected or quarantined before they are recirculated. Other permitted services include: child care services mental health and addiction support services, to a limit of 10 people social services Prior Inputted Comments: (Saturday) March 20th, 2021 REF: Libraries are ESSENTIAL Services Sir / Madam, In addition to the necessity of the re-opening of the OPL "24 /7 - (Return) Drop-Boxes". There is a significant need for INCREASED access, to the "PUBLIC" computers. Only being able to access a COMPUTER with an Internet connection and a SCANNER, PRINTER, or (COPIER), for a hour or less a day, and that excludes Sundays, when numerous branches are usually open, from September to June, but (still) continue to be closed. Coupled with the (on-going) Sunday closures, the current (overall) branch hours are insufficient, especially, the evening hours, from Monday to Thursday. As well, individuals must be able to book a computer, over a seven-day period, not the current dismal, only three days and individuals need to be able to book for two or more consecutive hours, each day. For those many OPL Management and Employees, who are NOT part of the "DIGITAL DIVIDE. That is to say, they do not lack "24/7 access to "high-speed" Internet, linked to a computing device, along with a connected scanner, printer, or copier", I would suggest that each one should try to function, for at least a week, within the current OPL parameters for accessing a "PUBLIC" computer. I propose that their (or your) overall ability to function (well) at work or home, or both would be severely curtailed. Yet, that is the what the OPL, as well as the City of Ottawa, the Province of Ontario, and the Government of Canada have unilaterally imposed on individuals and families, who are part of the "digital divide", for now over one year. For those individuals and families, who are part of the "digital divide", the "PUBLIC" library, whether in Ottawa or elsewhere in Canada, is an absolute necessity. Cordially yours, - A Concerned Patron -

RE:

Ottawa Public Library is following direction from the Province of Ontario and guidance from Ottawa Public Health to reduce the potential transmission of COVID-19 in our community. OPL is offering curbside services at 31 open branches. Also, OPL has put in place safe access to printing, WiFi and computers, during the current provincial stay-at-home order, to help address the disparity in access to technology in our community. As one of the largest providers of public computing in Ottawa, the Library is a lifeline for printing and internet for many.