The New York Times Editors’ Best Books of 2017

21/12/2017

Many of us are familiar with the New York Times weekly bestseller lists that are posted throughout our libraries and appear within the newspapers.  James Patterson, Danielle Steel, and John Grisham are some popular authors that regularly make the lists with their new titles.  These lists are a great way to keep abreast of new and popular titles, and to see what types of materials are gaining traction.

I recently came across a list from the editors of the New York Times Book Review that highlighted their top ten picks from 2017.  From Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing to Naomi Alderman’s The Power this list provided many good options for some great winter reads.

Let us know in the comments section if you have read any of these titles, and any thoughts you want to share regarding them.

Top Ten Picks of 2017 from the editors of the New York Times Book Review by charmaine_library

  • Image: Autumn

    Autumn

    By Smith, Ali
    This novel explores the friendship between an elderly songwriter and the child of a neighbour, going back and forth through the decades, from the 1960’s to Brexit.
  • Image: Exit West

    Exit West

    A Novel
    By Hamid, Mohsin
    Hamid details the life of a couple fleeing civil war, using magic doors . An exploration of exile, the psychology within, and an examination of political fault lines in our society.
  • Image: Pachinko

    Pachinko

    By Lee, Min Jin
    A story exploring the lives of four generations of a Korean family, from the period of Japanese-occupied Korea to Japan in the 1980's. An examination of belonging and identity, this novel delves deep into the lives of this family, and how their history has impacted their lives.
  • Image: The Power

    The Power

    A Novel
    By Alderman, Naomi
    Alderman's The Power examines a world in which women have a special 'electrostatic power' that is shifting the dynamics between genders. Drawing comparisons to Margaret Atwood's dystopian novels, this novel explores a world in which women obtain a unique power, and the inherent consequences of that power…
  • Image: Sing, Unburied, Sing

    Sing, Unburied, Sing

    A Novel
    By Ward, Jesmyn
    A story of hope, and struggle, Ward’s novel explores the life of Jojo, a thirteen year old boy, and his family, as he begins to understand what “being a man” means. An exploration of race, of family limitations, of violence and of legacies.
  • Image: The Evolution of Beauty

    The Evolution of Beauty

    How Darwin's Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World-- and Us
    By Prum, Richard O.
    A defense of Darwin's second theory of sexual selection, this non-fiction title explores the forces shaping the species, including choices regarding the mating habits of females. From birds to humans, Prum explores the beauty and subjectivity of the process of evolution.
  • Image: Grant

    Grant

    By Chernow, Ron
    A biography of Ulysses S. Grant, the president of the United States of America during the 19th century's Gilded Age. This biography recounts the many (perhaps overlooked) accomplishments of his presidency, as well as the courage he showed throughout. Grant fought for and signed the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 which permitted the government to intervene against Klan violence, and he enforced it. His leadership was credited as smashing the KKK in the south in 1872.
  • Image: Locking up Our Own

    Locking up Our Own

    Crime and Punishment in Black America
    By Forman, James
    Forman, previously a public defender, writes of the effects of race and incarceration, as experienced by African American officials within the justice system. Forman posits that penal reform in regard to mass incarceration requires a new comprehension around the meaning of justice, and of accountability.
  • Image: Prairie Fires

    Prairie Fires

    The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder
    By Fraser, Caroline
    This biography of Laura Ingles Wilder (author of The Little House of the Prairie) explores and refreshes western American history. Fraser explores the relationship between Wilder and her daughter, as well as the right-wing political views they held as she pieces together a vivid image of this complex woman.
  • Image: Priestdaddy

    Priestdaddy

    By Lockwood, Patricia
    Lockwood's memoir explores her experiences growing up and coming of age with a father who is a Roman Catholic priest (specially dispensed from the Vatican).