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Opening this Thursday: Angel Square

Angel Square - GCTC
01/12/2015

"This year the GCTC’s holiday selection for all ages is an adapation of an Ottawa favourite. Angel Square, based on the novel for children by Brian Doyle, is a story set in post-war Ottawa that touches on issues of class, prejudice and community against the backdrop of the Christmas season. I was able to read the script for Angel Square as part of our "Stages and Pages" partnership with the GCTC, and I found it thought-provoking, touching and funny. It’s fascinating to get a glimpse of the Ottawa of 1945, so different from today, yet full of familiar landmarks.

The following resources include some novels with similar themes and settings, as well as several wonderful non-fiction books providing images and information about Ottawa’s history, for those who would like to learn more!"

   (Posted on behalf of Allison at OPL.)

GCTC 2015-2016: Angel Squareby OttawaGoodReads

As part of the Ottawa Public Library's "Stages and Pages" partnership with the Great Canadian Theatre Company, we have compiled this list to accompany the production of Angel Square at the GCTC which runs December 3 -Decmeber20, 2016.

  • Image: Angel Square

    Angel Square

    By Doyle, Brian
    This is the novel upon which Janet Irwin’s play adaptation is based. In post-WWII Ottawa, twelve-year-old Tommy works with a group of friends to find out who committed an anti-Semitic attack on his friend Sammy’s father. Tommy’s colourful, diverse Lowertown neighbourhood is the backdrop for this glimpse of Ottawa’s past.
  • Image: Rex Zero, King of Nothing
    Another glimpse of Ottawa’s past, this time set during the summer of 1962. Rex, a funny ten- year-old transplant from Vancouver, gets to know his new city, makes new friends and learns more about his father’s experiences fighting in WWII, all under the shadow of the Cold War.
  • Image: The Sky Is Falling
    The first book in the Guests of War Trilogy, set in and around Toronto, follows ten-year-old Norah and her younger brother Gavin as they are evacuated from a village in England to Toronto during the Second World War.
  • Image: Looking at the Moon
    The second book in the Guests of War Trilogy takes Norah and Gavin from Toronto to a cottage in Muskoka as they continue to navigate their lives as outsiders in Canada.
  • Image: The Lights Go on Again
    The final book in the Guests of War Trilogy. Norah and Gavin face difficult choices at the end of the war—to stay in their new home in Canada, or return to an England they barely remember.
  • Image: Al Capone Does My Shirts
    Set in the 1930s, this coming of age story features a funny, compassionate twelve-year-old who moves with his family to the prison island of Alcatraz when his father gets a job there. Moose is very protective of his older sister who is autistic.
  • Image: Each Morning Bright

    Each Morning Bright

    160 Years of Selected Readings From the Ottawa Citizen, 1845-2005
    Selected articles, illustrations and advertisements from the archives of the Ottawa Citizen open a window in our past.
  • Image: Ottawa, An Illustrated History
    A history of Ottawa, illustrated by historical photographs and maps, shows how much the geography of the city has been shaped by its inhabitants.
  • Image: Ottawa, Then & Now

    Ottawa, Then & Now

    By Holzman, Jacquelin
    Historical photographs and paintings are accompanied by brief text to tell the story of Ottawa in an accessible visual manner.