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Winner - Battle of the Books 2018

20/08/2018

We had quite a summer with the 2018 Battle of the Books.  With voting closing officially at 12:00 a.m. on August 19th, we are happy to announce that the winner of this year’s Battle of the Books is Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds. 

Do you have another readalike suggestion for Long Way Down ?  In the comment section below, tell us in a few sentences, which book it is and why you would recommend it.  All the comments on this blog post (English and French) will be entered  in a draw for the weekly $25 Chapters gift card prize.  Enter your comment by Sunday, August 26th (one entry per comment).  The winner will be contacted directly by email or phone.  

Double your chance to win prizes!  Tell us your readalike suggestion for the runner up.

 On the French side of the competition in the "Combat des livres", Pourquoi les filles ont mal au ventre by Lucile de Pesloüan Labelle is this year's winner in le Combat des livres.

 

 

Thank you to everyone who participated in our Battle of the Books!  Our next big event for teens will be the Teen Author Fest taking place on Saturday October 27th at Southminster church and Sunnyside branch.  Stay tuned for details to come!

Long Way Down by Ottawa_Teens

they all deal with the inner lives of Black teens in America. #blacklivesmatter

Pourquoi les filles ont mal au ventre? by Ottawa_Teens

Comments

Another book which also deals with gun violence on teens is The Hate U Give. This book is very good since it has a female of colour protagonist, who strives to stand up and make a change in the community she lives in. Not only she has to suffer from the loss of her friend to police brutality, but she also has to battle with gun violence in her neighborhood.

I also wanted to recommend "The Hate U Give", as above, as it is critically acclaimed! I will instead recommend another readalike book is "Dear Martin" by Nic Stone. I recommend it also does a great job at tackling issues of gun violence and police brutality, from the perspective of a young black teen.. The main character is a star student, athlete, and on his way to an Ivy League college. He ends up in violent situations with corrupt, racist, and violent police, changing the way his daily interactions with his peers and classmates, and feeling scorn and worry about his future. He struggles with clearing his name in the situations that he ended up in, as he writes journal entries to Dr Martin Luther King. It's a good page-turner and I think the reader wants fair justice for everything that has happened to the main character.